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Ofsted, Reports and Data Facts

The school was last inspected by Ofsted in March 2014.  Our school was judged to be Outstanding in all areas.
In summary the Ofsted team said that Alderley Edge CP School is 'exceedingly well led and managed by the headteacher, very ably supported by the deputy headteacher, other leaders and governors. Checks on the quality of teaching and achievement of pupils are meticulous and show marked improvement over time. All staff and governors work together well to move the school forward. All staff are highly valued and are committed to helping all pupils reach their potential. Staff morale is high.  The curriculum is rich and provides pupils with a wide range of memorable experiences to improve their basic skills and promote their personal development very well'.

The Inspectors also said that 'Children in the Early Years Foundation Stage make excellent progress from their different starting points. Pupils throughout the school achieve exceptionally well and reach well above average standards in reading, writing and mathematics. Teaching is consistently good and frequently outstanding and has improved since the last inspection. Expectations of pupils are always high and work in books is of a high standard'.

 

Ofsted Report 2014

To read this and previous Ofsted Reports please use the following link - AECP School Ofsted Reports
Parents can comment on the school using the Ofsted website known as Parent View

 

Public Sector Equality Duty

Our school always aims to fulfil the requirements of this duty to ensure everyone is supported equally.

What is it?
On 5 April 2011, the public sector equality duty (the equality duty) came into force. The equality duty was created under the Equality Act 2010.

The equality duty replaced the race, disability and gender equality duties. The first of these duties, the race equality duty in 2001, came out of the Macpherson Report on the murder of the black teenager, Stephen Lawrence. Following failures of the investigation of Lawrence’s murder, the report revealed institutional racism in the Metropolitan Police. It was clear that a radical rethink was needed in the approach that public sector organisations were taking towards addressing discrimination and racism.

The equality duty was developed in order to harmonise the equality duties and to extend it across the protected characteristics. It consists of a general equality duty, supported by specific duties which are imposed by secondary legislation.  In summary, those subject to the equality duty must, in the exercise of their functions, have due regard to the need to:

  • Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and other conduct prohibited by the Act.
  • Advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.
  • Foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.

These are sometimes referred to as the three aims or arms of the general equality duty. The Act explains that having due regard for advancing equality involves:

  • Removing or minimising disadvantages suffered by people due to their protected characteristics.
  • Taking steps to meet the needs of people from protected groups where these are different from the needs of other people.
  • Encouraging people from protected groups to participate in public life or in other activities where their participation is disproportionately low.

The Act states that meeting different needs involves taking steps to take account of disabled people's disabilities. It describes fostering good relations as tackling prejudice and promoting understanding between people from different groups. It states that compliance with the duty may involve treating some people more favourably than others.

The equality duty covers the nine protected characteristics: age, disability, gender reassignment, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation.  Public authorities also need to have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination against someone because of their marriage or civil partnership status.

More information can be found by clicking on the title of this section.